Invasive Reptiles

Burmese pythons, northern African pythons, Argentine black and white tegus, Nile monitors, and spectacled caiman are invasive reptiles in the Greater Everglades. They negatively impact the system by taking over areas from native species, and by consuming other organisms like fish and birds.

See the results for invasive reptiles in the Greater Everglades.

Photo credit: R. Cammauf.

How is it measured?

Burmese pythons, northern African pythons, Argentine black and white tegus, Nile monitors, and spectacled caiman were selected as performance measures (PMs) for invasive reptiles in the Greater Everglades based on presence in the Greater Everglades ecosystem, relevance as targets of interagency management efforts, and existence of adequate information for scoring. Each PM was scored based on three metrics: abundance, spread, and impacts. The primary data source was EDDMapS (https://www.eddmaps.org/florida/Species/) data on distribution and occurrence, supplemented with data from the Everglades Invasive Reptile and Amphibian Monitoring Program, the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission, and professional judgement. Scores for each PM were totaled and assigned a stoplight color and condition. PM scores were summed into a Greater Everglades score.

Threshold Levels

The desired condition for each metric is as follows: decreasing abundance and spread leading to absence, and minimal to no impacts.